My Yoke Is Easy

It was one of those blue days that some of us get. Being overtired certainly was a contributing factor, having overextended myself the day before. (When will I learn that enough is enough?)

Still, it was much too early to go to bed, and the available reading material just couldn’t rouse my interest, much less my energy. Normally when I feel this way, I’d like to have someone around who could commiserate with me, comfort me. The grace was that I decided to put in a call to my friend who had been suffering from sinusitis. Common sense would have told me that she’d certainly not be in the mood to listen to my griping nor to console me. Which is what made this idea a Grace, and not just a whim.

As we conversed, I experienced a new liveliness forming within me. Not that we were talking about anything “important;” just your usual “hi, what’s happening?” kind of trivia. By the time we hung up, I was surprised by how energized I felt. The blues were disappearing, and out of the blue came these lines from Matthew 25:

Come to me, all you who labor and are burdened and I will give   you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am meek and humble of heart; and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden light.

The amazing thing is that Christ does not offer to take away our labor or the burden, which is what we usually ask him to do. Instead, he invites us to take on something additional: his yoke. I could see the connection to what Christ was telling me, and what the Holy Spirit inspired me to do: imitate Christ, take your friend’s troubles upon yourself. Instead of becoming more gloomy, your mood will lighten and you will feel comforted.

The yoke is the perfect metaphor for what Christ is teaching us here. It is designed to spread the weight between two animals, usually oxen or even mules. Jesus, both gentle and humble, willingly stoops to our level – and even lower – to join us in carrying our burdens.

 Instead of being an added burden, Christ’s yoke is “easy” and “light.” Christ offers us this counter-intuitive solution that we are likely to miss unless we’re open to his voice.

And so it was with the solution I was offered: seek out someone who is in a situation similar to yours, someone who feels burdened and tired. As we offer support to another for the love of Christ, Christ lightens our burdens.

yoke 2

On the First Day of the Week

 Mary Magdalene at the Tomb

A mutilated body,
Once strong and noble,
Lies in cold aloneness and emptiness.
Nothing good could come out of Galilee.

The great stone, pregnant with uncountable fears,Mary at the tomb
Big with hosts of indifferent hearts,
Bars entry to the cave:
The tomb of dead hopes and desires.

A weak and weeping woman comes.
Flaming tears of faith melt stone,
And cause explosions of love.

Faith bursts throughout the globe.
Hope is resurrected!
Fear dies, extinguished by Trust!

July 22, 2016

Odyssey of an Oblate

It didn’t take much to persuade me.

A couple of years ago I made a short retreat at Transfiguration Monastery. One of my purposes was to learn more about monasticism. Not that I was thinking of entering the monastery, but rather, drawn to the spirituality of monasticism, I wanted to learn about the “monastery of the heart.”

The very concept of monasticism – the totality of its dedication to the interior life, to a growing intimacy with God – had appealed to me long ago, even in my teens. But life takes us on different paths and here I was, close to where I had wanted to be so long ago.

After a short but substantive conversation with Sister Mary Donald, she gave me copies of some of her articles, along with the Esther de Waal book, Seeking God: The Way of St. Benedict. That sounded like just the thing, as indeed it was!

 I resumed going to Mount Saviour Monastery which is less than a ten-minute ride from my home and had some conversations with then-prior Father Joseph Gabriel. He told me I needed to write him a letter requesting acceptance as an Oblate of Mt. Saviour. I composed and sent the letter that very day. He later described the simple process: I would attend a brief rite to publicly express my desire and choose a name. This part was easy too, and just seemed to pop out of my mouth. My patroness? Mary Magdalene whose feast just “happened” to be within the next 10 days!

 Father Joseph steered me to the writings of Michael Casey, OCSO, who explores in depth every word of the Rule. I was formally received last year, shortly before Father Joseph left.

 While the whole process of my becoming an Oblate seems very short and maybe even inordinately swift, I must emphasize that this had been in my mind and heart for many years. The decision was relatively quick only because it had been gestating in my spirit for literally decades, even if at times it had been submerged beneath other activities.

Mary MagdaleneHow did I decide so spontaneously on Mary Magdalene? Certainly, Thérèse of Lisieux has long been a favorite of mine since girlhood. But Mary Magdalene seemed closer to the adult me. She was one of the few to endure watching the lengthy dying of Jesus crucified. How much love and strength did that require! She was then the first to see and speak to the risen Christ. In her great love and joy, she threw herself at his feet, clinging to him, not wanting to be separated from him. Christ commissioned her to give the good news to the brother apostles. He had total trust that she would do this, even though this was a very bold action for a woman.

 There is much we do not know about Mary’s apostolate after that. Pope Francis has just “upgraded” her feast day, July 22, to the same level of celebration that is accorded to the other apostles. After so many centuries when she was associated with practically every fallen woman in the Gospels, it is a true grace to have her honored in this way.

 Yes, she had needed serious help from our Lord. Luke’s Gospel tells us that Jesus had expelled seven demons from her. Like any other Christian, she undoubtedly was flawed. And with us, all of us flawed, she received forgiveness with great joy and gratitude. We’re in good company.

St. Benedict

Like us, Benedict needed to search and try out different ways of serving God.

Mt Saviour Sculpture
Wood sculpture at Mt. Saviour Monastery, Pine City, NY

I enjoyed hearing about St. Benedict in the homily given on his feast day, July 11.

Like us, Benedict needed to search and try out different ways of serving God. That he would be known as the Father of western monasticism – which he’s noted for – did not come to him in a single great flash of insight or experience.

No. First, he was an “ordinary” Christian like us, going to Mass, reading and pondering Scripture. Because he lived in a somewhat degenerate Rome, he soon realized that living as a hermit would allow him to make a greater space within, a quiet space for the Spirit to fill. He therefore withdrew to a cave near the town of Subiaco, mentored by a monk by the name of Romanus.

He must have lived an exemplary life, for soon a group of monks appealed to him to be their spiritual leader, according to the biography written by St. Gregory the Great. But life lived by the Gospel and as taught by Benedict turned out not to be to their liking, and they planned to get rid of him by poisoning his wine. As Benedict blessed the carafe, it suddenly shattered, saving Benedict’s life, and saving the irritable brothers from grave sin.

For more reading on Benedict, his Rule, and the proliferation of priests, religious and laity dedicated to his teachings, see the following:

  • The Order of St. Benedict
  • Seeking God: The Way of St. Benedict, by Esther de Waal
  • Strangers to the City, by Michael Casey, OCSO