Overcome With Paschal Joy

It’s remarkable that during this triumphant Easter season I’ve been led to meditations on death. Could there be a better time for that topic?

First, regarding how we refer to that dread event: “death.”

We usually prefer to use a euphemism for that experience: passing away; meeting our Maker; or even the more flippant buying the farm. We save blessed event for the happy birth of a child, but we could just as easily and accurately apply that phrase to death, especially during this holy season when we are “overcome with Paschal joy.”

At Easter, we refer to Christ’s victory over death. It’s easy to grow over-accustomed to phrases like this and lose the depth of their meaning. Only recently have I come to a discovery of what this phrase means. Jesus obviously did not “conquer” death by eliminating it. Instead, he ran to meet it, even though his was the very worst kind of death, having been unjustly convicted of the most heinous crime, so far removed from the very purpose of his existence: total dedication and fidelity to God’s message and his mission. His was a cruel death to both body and dignity.

The victory was in his resurrection, attested to by so many so that we latecomers might be convinced of an unending future with him. At his farewell, Christ told his Apostles:

You have faith in God; have faith in me also!
I am going first to prepare a place for you,
so that you may be with me and the Father for all time.

What a blessed season for dying! A few days after Easter, our loving Benedictine Brother Justin died unexpectedly. Two of my own siblings also died during Easter week some years ago. I’ve always considered this a great grace: to enter heaven accompanied by our resurrected Savior.

I’ve also found myself inspired with a new appreciation for the famous poem of John of the Cross. The translation as the “Dark Night” is really inexact. The poet writes of a blessed night that may be obscure for sure, but not totally dark. He speaks of a graced obscurity where a divine light serves as his guide. Like St. Paul, he sees only “darkly” now. He knows there is something behind or within this obscurity; it is neither totally black nor totally empty. He has the certain expectation of finding a splendor beyond imagining. The light of faith assures him that there is a brilliance to this particular night, a brilliance hidden from his understanding, but no less true and blindingly beautiful. He knows that human understanding is too weak and limited to grasp, except through grace, what is really happening and why. While John of the Cross refers to the spiritual journey in life, his description can be equally applied to the process of a Christian death.

These contemporary Spanish mystics, John of the Cross and Teresa of Avila, both wrote poems on the theme of longing for the only way to see God: in death. I die because I do not die!

John of the Cross:

I live, but not in myself,
And I have such hope
That I die because I do not die.

Teresa of Avila:

I live only with the confidence
that I have to die . . .
Death, do not delay,
for I await you,
for I die because I do not die.

These poet-saints echo St. Paul’s utterly consoling statement: For me, to live is Christ and to die is gain. (Philippians 1:21)

To die is gain. No longer will we need to content ourselves with fleeting glimpses of God’s love. Paul realized that the most beautiful aspect of being alive on this earth is knowing Christ, being certain of his love and brotherhood here, and our relationship coming to complete fruition after death. We know that a faith-filled death assures us of an enduring and ever-increasing joy in God’s presence, along with the presence of our loved ones previously considered lost to us.

I certainly won’t deny the pain that we, the survivors, must endure when a loved one dies. When a beloved friend leaves us, that death creates a large hole of emptiness and grief. But even that space is a blessing. For into that crater of grief, God pours the ever-increasing and certain comfort of His presence, love, and compassion.

This is the true joy of the Paschal season, in that we have been gifted with knowledge of Christ’s own death and resurrection. We can never again view death as a terminus, but as our third birth: birth as a human in a universe of time, space and matter; rebirth as Christians in a baptism of faith and love; and the final, culminating birth-in-death when through Christ we are transformed and welcomed into an unending union with the All-Loving Trinity.

Easter Joy
Life is changed, not taken away.

 

 

 

 

Author: Rosalie P. Krajci

Rosalie P. Krajci, Ph. D., is a Benedictine Oblate of Mt. Saviour Monastery in Pine City, NY. She is retired from two careers: as a language teacher and as a consultant in human resources management. Her third and most rewarding career is as a spiritual director and freelance writer. Rosalie and her husband Tom raised seven children. Now widowed, she lives in the Finger Lakes area in upstate New York.

One thought on “Overcome With Paschal Joy”

  1. What a beautiful way to explain what you believe happens when you leave this life. A warm read. Thank you.

    Love and hugs, Dolores

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s